Trial & Error at the Derby Living Room Remodel

From country bumpkin to rustic modern, we’re finding our way through this living room update!

When we remodeled Lynn and Bill’s kitchen and dining room a couple years ago we ran some board & batten to dress things up. Now that we’re back updating the living room (and a few other rooms) we wanted to continue that into the living room to add something to the space.

Originally we wanted to go higher than in the other rooms to offer a better look at it with all the furniture, but once it was up, Lynn and few others who got a sneak peek weren’t sure higher was better. Looking into the kitchen and dining room from the living room you would see the batten board in both rooms, and since this was going to be the only wall in the living room to have it, that’s really what it needed to tie together.

And we had to agree—it would work better staying consistent even if that meant loosing some visibility behind the couch.

Visit us at preferredserviceswny to see more of this home improvement story!

January 17 Project Update:

Here’s the final version of the batten for the living room. We brought it down to the same height as the kitchen and dining room, and painted everything.

Lynne has promised us pictures once all her new furniture is in and we can’t wait to see the finishing touches to transform this project!

Trial & Error at the Derby Living Room Remodel

From country bumpkin to rustic modern, we’re finding our way through this living room update!

When we remodeled Lynne and Bill’s kitchen and dining room a couple years ago we ran some board & batten to dress things up. Now that we’re back updating the living room (and a few other rooms) we wanted to continue that into the living room to add something to the space.

Board and Batten in living room Board and batten in living roomOriginally we wanted to go higher than in the other rooms to offer a better look at it with all the furniture, but once it was up, Lynn and few others who got a sneak peek weren’t sure higher was better. Looking into the kitchen and dining room from the living room you would see the batten board in both rooms, and since this was going to be the only wall in the living room to have it, that’s really what it needed to tie together.

And we had to agree—it would work better staying consistent even if that meant loosing some visibility behind the couch.

Visit us at preferredserviceswny to see more of this home improvement story and find out how it all turns out!

The Fight For and Against Landmark Status


Perhaps hoping to learn from past mistakes with the legacy of Frank Lloyd Wright in Western New York, the Preservation Board has moved ahead with landmarking two of the homes he built in Buffalo.

William R. Heath House 1937
William R. Heath House 1937

Two Buffalo houses designed by Frank Lloyd Wright were recommended for local landmark designation Thursday by the Buffalo Preservation Board. While the board has often been criticized for not acting quickly enough to protect the historic and significant buildings throughout Buffalo, not everyone is happy with their decision to move forward on these two properties.

Both the William R. Heath House and the Walter V. Davidson House were granted landmark status despite the owners’ objections.

Although the homes met seven of the nine criteria for landmarking, Nancy Schmid, who has owned the Heath House for 50 years, said she did not welcome the added tourist attention she feared landmarking could bring. People often come to her front door asking for tours of the home, unaware that its a private residence.

The Walter V. Davidson House 2009
The Walter V. Davidson House 2009

Likewise, Russ Maxwell, owner of the Davidson House and a former member of the Preservation Board, also objects to landmark status, claiming, “The property at 57 Tillinghast is in the finest condition in its 110-year history.”

Both Schmid and Maxwell have said they believe the homes should be landmarked in the future, but assert that since they have maintained the integrity of Wright’s designs and continue to use the homes as private residences, their wishes should override the Preservation Board’s decision.

The final decision will be up to the Buffalo Common Council, which will rule on the matter following a public hearing.  Since the Preservation Board has stated that their only responsibility is to the buildings themselves and the significance they represent for the community, perhaps the Common Council will be more willing to take the owners’ opinions and track records for stewardship of the properties into account.